Cavities,  Decay,  DIY

DIY dental checkups – self-checking and diagnosing teeth for cavities

This article is under development, please check back later for more information. Before reading the article please read the disclaimer and be sure that you have fully understood it.

Caution! This article is for dental nerds or people who would love to see and know more than a regular patient. Please be aware that self-checking your teeth does not substitute checkup performed by a dentist and it should not prolong intervals between seeing your dentist. If anything, it should make you visit your dentist sooner if you notice any spots that bother you.

In this article you will learn following skills:

What will you need to self-check your teeth?

While you may be able to see some parts of your lower and upper teeth by just starting into a mirror please be aware that accessories listed below are neccessary to be able to see your teeth well – that is every surface of every tooth.

  • dental mirror
  • LED torch
  • regular bathroom mirror on the wall
  • …and last but not least: skill and knowledge

Tooth surfaces

Each of your teeth have 5 surfaces which need to be inspected when doing a self-check. Let’s learn the naming system of them before we begin, as this will surely make it easier for you to communicate anything troublesome to your dentist. To indentify a specific area of a tooth you name the tooth by it’s number (see next paragraph for reference), but also it is necessary to utilize specific named surface, according to where it is located. Please see the list below for reference:

Distal – The surface that is away from the midline of the face.
Facial – The surface that faces the cheeks or lips. Can also use the terms:
Labial – The surface towards the lips.
Buccal – The surface towards the cheeks.
Incisal – The biting edge of an anterior tooth.
Lingual – The surface that faces the tongue.
Mesial – The surface that is closest to the midline of the face.
Occlusal – The chewing surface of posterior teeth.
Proximal – Tooth surfaces that are next to each other (i.e., distal of lateral incisor and mesial of canine).

Teeth types and their numbers

To precisely communicate which teeth you mention it is important to learn the Universal System, in which permanent dentition is numbered from 1-32 beginning with the maxillary right third molar. There are also other designation and identification systems but in English speaking countries this one is the most popular.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *